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Member
flycherokee
Posts: 3

red light flashing on a 42HL196.

I have a 4 year old LCD TV.  When I got home Monday, a red light was blinking in a 3 blink pattern.  The manual says that it's rebooting, but it's been shouldn't take this long.  I've tried unplugging it for around 6 hours but that didn't seem to help.  Is there anything I can do or must I have a repair tech fix it?

Member
Valpo
Posts: 1

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

[ Edited ]

Same problem just occured with my set.  Toshiba says to take it into a shop.  i've tried plugging and unplugging all weekend.  No luck.

Member
necye
Posts: 2

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.


flycherokee wrote:

I have a 4 year old LCD TV.  When I got home Monday, a red light was blinking in a 3 blink pattern.  The manual says that it's rebooting, but it's been shouldn't take this long.  I've tried unplugging it for around 6 hours but that didn't seem to help.  Is there anything I can do or must I have a repair tech fix it?


I have same problem with 42HL196 and also 4 years old. Mine happened last night while we were watching it - it made a snap or pop sound and picture went blank with red timer rec light flashing 3 times with a pause and repeats.  I've searched online, we aren't the only ones.  Called one service they want $150.00 just to look at it not parts and labor.  High price for a 4 year old TV, really expected it to last more than 4 years.  Help!

Member
necye
Posts: 2

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

FYI, it is the flashing light of death.  It is almost as much to fix this as it is to buy a new TV.  I hope to have better luck with another brand.  Too bad...


necye wrote:

flycherokee wrote:

I have a 4 year old LCD TV.  When I got home Monday, a red light was blinking in a 3 blink pattern.  The manual says that it's rebooting, but it's been shouldn't take this long.  I've tried unplugging it for around 6 hours but that didn't seem to help.  Is there anything I can do or must I have a repair tech fix it?


I have same problem with 42HL196 and also 4 years old. Mine happened last night while we were watching it - it made a snap or pop sound and picture went blank with red timer rec light flashing 3 times with a pause and repeats.  I've searched online, we aren't the only ones.  Called one service they want $150.00 just to look at it not parts and labor.  High price for a 4 year old TV, really expected it to last more than 4 years.  Help!


 

Member
CPADRE
Posts: 2

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Why has this not been recalled?

Member
gilbyj
Posts: 1

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

We have a 4yr old 42lx196 it also has a blinking red light after it made a snap shortly after the on button was pushed.

they claim it is 450$ to repair it at a toshiba dealer but it appears there is a known problem here has anyone had luck getting answers on this? 

Member
d-tut
Posts: 2

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

3 blinks 42hl196 . main power supply failure . replace strw6765 switch mode regulater standby main power.

Member
d-tut
Posts: 2

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

replace strw6765 in main power brd.

Member
zarbat
Posts: 3

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

i replaced strw6765 and still red light flashing on my Toshiba TV Model 42HL196,  What should i do now?

 

alex

Member
zarbat
Posts: 3

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

[ Edited ]

sorry, my mistake, I had issue with my sodering, now it's working...replacing strw6765 is correct.

thank you

-Alex

Member
tannoy
Posts: 1

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Thanks for sharing the story. i have exactly same issue with my TV with same model and try to follow your fix. Where is the main power board? Do i have to completely remove the backcover of the TV? 

Member
bummerdood
Posts: 1

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Mine failed with the flashing red light too. It sort of popped and then the picture went out, followed by the flashing red light. I tried disconnecting form power for a few minutes, then reconnected. When I plugged it back in, it clicks a few times and then flashes red. This TV is barely 5 years old and was not heavily used. I'm disappointed.

 

If you google a bit, this seems to be a pretty common problem for this model. This post has some good information about what the issue might be for some of us with the problem. I'm going to replace board 75002913 as suggested and see if I can bring it back to life. I found the part on ebay for $100 (refurb/core swap.) It's hard to justify spending much more than that to try and repair it considering the price of new TVs today.

 

My next TV will not be a Toshiba.


Member
Squashwa
Posts: 1

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Why waste $100 on a whole board. I spent $9 including shipping and about 2 hours time taking apart replacing STR-W6765 and it fixed the problem. Thank you for the fix!!! =)

Member
orphanelec
Posts: 1

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Seems like alot of us have had this problem.  Has anyone had it recently?  What happened to TVs lasting 20 years? :smileyhappy:

Well, time for me to get a new TV.  Never been very happy with this one anyway.  No Toshiba for me.

Member
skehanm
Posts: 1

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Red light "timer Rec" light flashes and TV picture will not come on. i do get sound.

Occasional Contributor
IKnowTech
Posts: 18

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Just got a 42HL196 for $50 exhibiting this issue.  It stopped turning ON suddenly after about 6 years of use, displaying the dreaded flashing red light.  The owner told me there was no noise or smell when it died but that info was third-hand.  I noticed the TV powered up OK for a few minutes after sitting unplugged for several days.  While running,  some DC voltages were a bit low and Q880's heatsink was getting alarmingly hot, but this still means no fuses blown and all of the semi's are working so I won't be replacing any just yet. 

 

On visual inspection, the capacitors on the power board looked OK so I had to investigate deeper before deciding if the repair kit of the usual suspects (Q880, Q820, Q860) was needed.  Looking at the schematic, the overvoltage protection circuit shuts down the main supplies when either the 24V backlight or the 12V main DC supplies exceed certain maximum levels, leaving only the standby supply powering the maintenance circuit that flashes the red front panel lamp.  When caps go bad, the pulsed power generated in switching power supplies cannot be smoothed the way it was designed to, resulting in voltage peaks well above the intended level.  I suspected the secondary filtering capacitors had dried out and were allowing either or both of the DC voltages to jump up and trip the protection circuit.  This matches the symptom that as the set AC cord is plugged in, the 12 DC power briefly appears on the first audible relay click, then disappears at the second click that immediately follows.  The 12V is supposed to remain ON for the Seine board since this TV receives TV Guide information while turned OFF. 

 

To verify this theory, I soldered around 50uF of ceramic capacitors on three rails; 24V, 12V, and 20V.  These were soldered on the backside of the power board in parallel with capacitors C872, C873, C888, C889, C890, C895, and C896.  When plugged in, the 12V remained present after the second relay click, and the TV turns on and works normally.  It appears the problem is bad capacitors and I'll be replacing those shortly.  I may also beef up the heatsink on Q880 as it appears to get quite hot.  From the schematic, this poor little guy has to deliver 80Watts of power, and it may be a design oversight that it is installed on such a small heatsink.  This could explain why this device commonly fails in these sets, given that it runs constantly as long as the set is plugged in.

 

For those owners that have simply replaced Q880 to get the TV working again, I caution that semis rarely fail on their own like that, and the device may have been destroyed by failing filter caps.  Coupled with the fact that it appears to be inadequately heatsinked, the new device may fail within a year or two.  Those owners that have replaced the device but still have the flashing red light,  check the presence of 12V when the set is plugged in.  If it is not there and the signal labeled POWER is at 2.5-3V, this is a good candidate for bad capacitors and I suggest replacing the seven capacitors identified earlier.  Make sure you replace them with caps that are life rated 5000-10000hours @105C.  Also pick the highest ripple current rating available.  All positions can tolerate capacitors that are up to 35mm tall if you can find taller ones with good ripple current ratings (3Amps or higher), just be sure they are no more than 12mm diameter except C895 and C896 which are 10mm diameter.

 

Occasional Contributor
IKnowTech
Posts: 18

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Just following up; add my voice to the many who have found that replacing Q880 (STRW6765) had fixed their TVs.   Although replaced capacitors did relieve enough electrical stress to permit the original device to start working, it must have already been crippled from prolonged exposure to overheating and degrading capacitors.  After about 2 weeks of use, the TV stopped working with the flashing red LED again.  It died when I re-plugged in the AC after re-arranging some power cords.  As I plugged it in, it made a different relay click sound, this time, one click followed by two closely spaced clicks.  While the TV was working, the second click was a single sound.  Turns out that third click is the sound of the main power relay opening up as Q880 shuts itself down.

 

Some measurements and scope tracings told me that everything but Q880 was operating, so I ordered a pair of STRW6765s' from KP Components Inc. (Canada).  The original Q880 had practically heat-bonded its plastic case to the heatsink; not a good sign and surprizing it lasted as long as it had.  During replacement, I removed Q880's heatsink entirely from the power board and bolted on two chunks of a small heatsink I had modified to fit.  I haven't measured the temperature but I figure they should make at least a 10-15C degree difference, which may be enough to pull the device away from the brink of long term thermal over-stress. 

 

With the new device and heatsink re-installed, the TV once again powers up and works normally.  A quick temperature probing by touch revealed that the new Q880 on the modified heatsink gets fairly warm but not as blazing hot as before.  Hopefully I won't need to use the second device but its always a good idea to buy more than one if they are cheap ($6 wasn't too bad).   CAUTION: DO NOT touch any of the the heatsinks on the power board if you are not using an isolation transformer. They are all connected to the live side common (-) which is NOT ISOLATED from the AC cord.

Member
b0w_bender
Posts: 3

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Thanks for this info, I'm not much for electronics but what the hell now is as good a time as any to start.

 

Member
b0w_bender
Posts: 3

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Can you tell me what board we're talking about I don't see any of those numbers on andy of the boards. It would help if you could narrow it down for me. A picture would be awesome.

Occasional Contributor
IKnowTech
Posts: 18

Re: red light flashing on a 42HL196.

Sorry, can't take a picture as I don't want to haul the TV down and re-open it. 

 

If you go to ShopJimmy.com and search up the Toshiba 75002913 Power Supply for 42HL196, there's a photo of it there.  Q880 is not visible from this angle but its mounted on the small upper left heat-sink just left of the board number PE-0071E-1.   The capacitors I replaced are that group of tall cans at the left end of the board, as well as the two just below the lower big heatsink.  For good measure, I also replace all the small electrolytic capacitors spread around the board even if I didn't suspect them as it effectively resets the lifespan of the board (electrolytic capacitors are the first things that die with age, often by a decade or more sooner than anything else unless there's a design problem). 

 

I can't emphasize the following enough:  This is all high voltage line-side circuitry; the 370-Volts DC that feeds Q880 and Q860 is instantly deadly.  Unless you've had experience working with circuitry that operates at these voltages and high voltage safety is ingrained into your instincts, I strongly recommend you have a qualified technician do the work.  This is not something that should be attempted by a novice.